Short Course: Use of GIS for Effective Policy Development at APSA Annual Meeting 2010

Date & Time:

Wednesday September 1, 2010 from 9:30 am to 1:00 pm

Location:

Balcony A of the Marriott Wardman Park, Washington DC

2660 Woodley Road NW
Washington, District Of Columbia 20008 USA
Phone: 1-202-328-2000

Approx. # of Attendees: 50

APSA URL: http://www.apsanet.org/mtgs/program_2010/program.cfm?event=1491301

Program:

9:30 – 9:40
Introduction: What is GIS? by Naoru Koizumi, GMU

9:40 – 10:00
Use of GIS and Remote Sensing in Epidemiology by Arnauld Nicogossian, GMU

10:00 – 10:20
GIS: Guilty of Committing Ecological Fallacy by David Wong, GMU

10:20 – 10:40
Mapping for Congress by Nick Jackson, Library of Congress

10:40 – 10:50
BREAK

10:50 – 11:10
Visualizing Complex Networks: Graph-Theoretic and Raster-Based Approach by Laurie Schintler, GMU

11:10 – 11:30
Envisioning Future Federal Workplaces in the National Capital Region by Ed Zolnik, GMU

11:30 – 11:50
Medical Geography Using GIS: Case Studies of Cardiac Catheterization Facilities and Childhood Obesity by Nigel Waters, GMU

11:50 – 12:10
NASA Earth Science and Applications by Lawrence A. Friedl, NASA

12:30 – 1:00
Q&A and conclusion

1:00
End of the workshop

 

Abstracts and presentations:

Introduction: What is GIS? by Naoru Koizumi, George Mason University

Dr. Koizumi will provide introduction to those who have limited knowledge on GIS. She will explain the basics of GIS, what kind of questions GIS can answer and provide introductions to the following studies. Dr. Koizumi is Associate Editor of a recently launched journal, World Medical and Health Policy, and she will explain how the outputs of this workshop will be summarized and included in a future issue of the journal as a policy forum issue.

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Use of GIS and Remote Sensing in Epidemiology by Arnauld Nicogossian, George Mason University

As an expert of Space Medicine and a former Chief Health and Medical Officer at NASA, Dr. Nicogossian will review how GIS and remote sensing technologies have been used in epidemiology projects implemented in NASA. Dr. Nicogossian is also a Senior Editor of a recently launched journal, World Medical and Health Policy. He will review some of the GIS articles recently published in the journal and will discuss the importance of GIS in the health area.


David Wong, George Mason University

After briefly defining ecological fallacy and its related modifiable areal unit problem, I will discuss why using GIS is likely to commit ecological fallacy. The main reason is that GIS deals with data representing regions or areas, and many maps are created using such data. Caveats of using spatially aggregated data will be highlighted, and using individual level data are called for. Using the segregation study as an example, I will illustrate that new conceptualizations and methods are needed to use individual-level data in GIS and to avoid committing ecological fallacy.

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Mapping for Congress by Nick Jackson, Library of Congress Presentation

In 2003 the Library of Congress Geography & Map Division formed the Congressional Cartography Program (CCP) to provide contemporary mapping and geospatial analysis needs within Congressional Offices. From providing basic Congressional District map to advance analysis on piracy activity in the Horn of Africa, the CCP actively applies GIS analysis methodologies and tool to answer public policy questions. Mr. Jackson will discuss general geospatial research methodology that the CCP staff follow while answering a research topic with GIS technology.”

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Visualizing Complex Networks: Graph-Theoretic and Raster-Based Approach by Laurie Schintler, George Mason University Presentation

Large-scale infrastructure networks, like the electric power grid, the IP backbone and the pipelines used to transport petroleum products, are highly susceptible to disruptions, either those that are created by accident or as the result of a malicious attack. This problem is compounded by the fact that there are both spatial and functional interdependencies between infrastructure networks. Understanding where vulnerable nodes and links exist in these networks, taking into account the interrelationship between systems, is important to the development of effective critical infrastructure protection and risk management strategies. The approaches that are typically used to identify critical nodes and links in large scale complex networks have some limitations. This presentation will discuss these weaknesses and also introduce an alternative technique that involves the use of raster analysis in GIS and mathematical graph theory. While the presentation focuses mainly on infrastructure applications, it should also be noted that the method can be applied to any network with a spatial dimension.

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Envisioning Future Federal Workplaces in the National Capital Region by Ed Zolnik, GMU

Abstract Not Available.

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Medical Geography Using GIS: Case Studies of Cardiac Catheterization Facilities and Childhood Obesity by Nigel Waters, George Mason University
We discuss two case studies: 1) In the United States where one child in three is overweight or obese, childhood obesity has become epidemic. This research uses GIS and spatial statistics to examine the pattern of childhood obesity for Grade 5 children in LA County, CA. Ordinary Least Squares and Geographically Weighted Regression are used to describe local variations in childhood obesity and to suggest ways of ameliorating the problem. 2) Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is preferred over fibrinolysis for the treatment of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). In the United States, nearly 80% of people aged 18 years and older have access to a PCI facility within 60 minutes. We used GIS to determine the areas in Canada and the proportion of the population aged 40 years and older with access to a PCI facility within 60, 90 and 120 minutes. In both studies we discuss political implications of our findings.

Presentation Not Available. For more details contact Dr. Nigel Waters

NASA Earth Science and Applications by Lawrence A. Friedl, NASA

Abstract Not Available.

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